Rebecca J. Hubbard

Children 0-5

Rebecca J. Hubbard, MS, LMFT provides psychotherapy to children 0-5 years of age.

 

Psychotherapy can help Young Children

The way a young child sees the world is different from the way older children and adults see it. As a result, they need a therapist with specialized training, who deeply understands them and understands the importance of parents in their life.

If your young child is struggling, call for a free consultation.

512-337-3347


"This was easily the best thing we could have done for our child. I understand and relate to my daughter in ways that I suspect few fathers do. Totally worth it!"                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Father of a 4 year old girl


 
   "Rebecca understood, supported and encouraged me when I felt I could not continue. She helped make my son’s big worries smaller and helped him find his body, his feelings and the courage to share his big heart."                                  Mother of an 18 month old boy

"Rebecca understood, supported and encouraged me when I felt I could not continue. She helped make my son’s big worries smaller and helped him find his body, his feelings and the courage to share his big heart."

                             Mother of an 18 month old boy

 

Partnering with parents to help children heal

Every day parents teach children how to calm their bodies and soothe their emotions. They do this when they:

  • provide physical comfort (i.e., holding them, rocking them, rubbing their backs)
  • listen to them and reflect back what they are saying
  • engage them in activities such as bubble breathing or singing a song (“When you’re mad and want to roar, take a deep breath and count to 4) 
  • assist them in expressing their feelings. (It looks like you feel mad)

Without a parent's help a young child is not able to cope with the myriad of emotions that he/she experiences in a day.

When a traumatic event happens often the child and parent are both overwhelmed. These overwhelmed feelings can effect the parent-child relationship. Normal strategies for coping do not seem adequate and at these times the parent and child feel that they are not understood.

Therapy can help restore the balance in your lives.


Communication Through Play

Therapy sessions with young children are very different than therapy sessions with school aged children or adolescents because young children communicate, process and learn through play.

In sessions a child and parent play together to:

  • assist the child in expressing his/her thoughts and feelings
  • identifying and correcting distortions in beliefs (i.e., daddy leaving is my fault)
  • allowing the child to try on new ways of being and doing.

Through play the parent and therapist work together to provide what the child needs in order to return the child to a normal developmental trajectory.

 
   "Listen to  your child as she plays and you will be able to understand her fears and her needs much better than you would be able to on your own. It is a window into your child’s soul."                                           Mother of a 3 year old girl

"Listen to  your child as she plays and you will be able to understand her fears and her needs much better than you would be able to on your own. It is a window into your child’s soul."

                                      Mother of a 3 year old girl


   "Helping children trust their bodies again and feel at home in them is one of my greatest joys."                                                                   Rebecca J. Hubbard

"Helping children trust their bodies again and feel at home in them is one of my greatest joys."                   

                                         Rebecca J. Hubbard

 

Signs your Child May have difficulties coping

  • Talks about a difficult or frightening experience over and over, acts out a difficult or frightening experience or avoids any discussions or play about the experience
  • Has difficulty getting along with others
  • Has difficulty regulating his/her emotions (examples: easily frustrated, hard to soothe)
  • Has difficulty sleeping (examples: refusal to go to sleep, nightmares, tantrums upon  waking)
  • Is more fearful of separating from you or fearful of new things
  • Has difficulty with even small changes in his/her routine
  • Harder to engage in play or activities, withdrawn, quiet
  • No longer enjoys activities/interests he/she used to enjoy
  • Seems to be a different child from day to day or even more frequently
  • Has difficulty trusting others
  • Constantly watches out for danger
  • Is unaware of biological needs such as hunger, thirst, needing to go the bathroom
  • Engage in activities that are inappropriate for his/her age
  • Stares into space for long periods of time or when you look at him/her his/her eyes appear empty or blank
  • Is in constant motion or appears frozen
  • Increase in aggressive behavior
  • loss of developmental milestones (i.e., was potty trained now wets himself, return to thumb sucking)
  • more clingy than usual